The Week in Ethics: Women Leaders Galvanize Detroit Around Justice

photo gold key in puzzle doorWhen things fall apart for lack of human and financial resources, becoming overwhelming, the key that enables leaders to transform the impossible to solvable is a compelling sense of greater purpose that is shared.

An illustration is the story of how Kym Worthy, Prosecutor of Wayne County, Michigan raised, and is a catalyst in efforts to continue to raise, the millions of dollars needed to process over 11,000 rape kits that were unopened and untested, found in Police storage; some there as long as 30 years. The move to solvable is often slow, demanding resilience. For Worthy, who began this effort in 2009, it evolved from personal and professional commitment and actions to enlisting others in the goal that justice be available to each rape victim.

As with any leadership act once it taps into others’ shared beliefs, momentum builds that can overcome obstacles. Worthy’s efforts got on the radar of Detroit businesswoman Joanna Cline who involved other Detroit businesses in raising funds, awareness and donating services. A public-private partnership called Enough SAID (Sexual Assault in Detroit) has been created.

Meanwhile, Detroit had its own problems filing for, and then emerging from, bankruptcy. This could have derailed the business leaders’ efforts. However the fundraising continued. As an outcome of ethical leadership, the stakeholders had grown to include the city of Detroit as well as the rape victims.

“The business community has rallied around us,” said Peg Tallet, chief community engagement officer at Michigan Women’s Foundation in an interview, “particularly businesswomen who are saying this can’t happen here if we are going to make this the city we’re all working to make it.”

Worthy’s office “has been able to identify 625 people suspected of being serial sexual assault offenders.” According to one of the businessmen involved in Enough SAID, “…you can’t have economic development if you can’t feel safe walking to your car after work.”

Those involved in Enough SAID provide a crucial teachable moment for other cities, governments, chambers of commerce, businesses and communities in general.

The Week in Ethics

Gael O’Brien, November 8, 2015

Gael O’Brien is The Ethics Coach columnist  for Entrepreneur Magazine. She is also a columnist for Business Ethics Magazine where her September column  is “Volkswagen’s Next Challenge: Keep Scandal from Happening Again.”

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