Archive for the ‘Community’ category

The Week in Ethics: How Owning Purpose Tames the Unexpected

December 30, 2016

Benjamin Franklin was brilliant, but in 1789 he forgot to include an essential element in his famous remark, “…in this world nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes.” He should have said “nothing can be certain except death, taxes AND dealing with the unexpected.”  leadership definition photo from istock

We use religion and spirituality to deal with death. CPAs with taxes. However, what helps us deal with the unexpected – the obstacles, setbacks and disappointments that throw our professional (or personal) world into chaos? The unexpected can paralyze. It can ruin our best intentions and shut us down faster than a Nor’easter blizzard.

We should never allow the unexpected to get in the way of making real our best intentions. After some soul searching, here are three questions I use to guide me through the unexpected:

What do I stand for? What can I count on about myself? What can inspire me to move forward in spite of problems the unexpected is causing?

I first remember using these questions when the unexpected challenged my new business.

When I started my business, a timely introduction enabled me to get work from a new VP at a global company in Boston. I was a very small fish, living in Columbus Ohio. The new VP was facing his first management committee meeting where he would pitch the project I was helping him create. I developed the materials he needed and emailed them. However, on the morning he replied asking for some additional elements — that would require a lot more research — it was only two days before his meeting and I’d just returned from the doctor. My nagging cold had raged overnight into a severe case of bronchitis. If I went back to bed (so tempting) I wouldn’t make his deadline. I knew there wouldn’t be more work from him once he got acclimated into his new company’s resources. And the money, while needed, was not as vital then as going to sleep. So I rationalized, surely someone at his company could take over. But then, I turned to my three questions.

What do I stand for? (My response was helping leaders succeed.)

What strengths could I count on here? (When I was healthy, I cared about my work and I had the skills to do what he needed.)

I struggled with what could inspire me to do the work feeling so sick. I visualized him walking into his meeting unprepared but that didn’t move me. Then I visualized his having convincing materials, winning approval and using what I’d done to make a difference at his company. That inspired me. I cared about creating that outcome enough that I was willing to spend the next 8 hours at the PC. I sent back the plan. His project was approved. I felt a sense of exhilaration that my purpose was real. Knowing that distracted me from how sick I felt.

How do we deal with the unexpected? By being recharged by our purpose. So as 2017 is ready to launch, if you haven’t discovered your purpose yet, take time to think about what you stand for/believe in that creates meaning in your work and gives you great satisfaction. A sense of purpose creates its own inspiration, producing a lot of positive energy.

Leadership expert Simon Sinek, in his TED talk “How Great Leaders Inspire Action,”  says purpose is the WHY behind what we do. It is what inspires others to follow us.

Most companies have mission or purpose statements. However when leaders’ actions don’t inspire employees in how they demonstrate it, we can’t let that stop us from taking our own and the organization’s purpose seriously. Research indicates that having a deeper sense of purpose creates engagement and satisfaction with one’s job. Everyone deserves that and we control the ability to have it.

Starbucks’ mission, for example, is “to inspire & nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”  A Starbucks I visit often has amazed me with how its employees show up. A barista called “hello Gael” after only my 3rd visit. Another barista, I didn’t remember waiting on me more than once, recited my drink order specifications when I reached the counter before I could order to see if she had it right. These simple acts created a sense of being part of a community there, something I’ve never experienced in any other Starbucks. No matter what unexpected problems might be going on in their personal or work lives, these baristas consistently make me (and others) feel valued, which is the essence of nurturing the human spirit.

When in our jobs or personal lives, the unexpected throws up roadblocks consider the power of your answers to these three questions.

What do you stand for? And what does your organization stand for?

What can you count on about yourself?

What can inspire you to move forward in spite of problems the unexpected is causing?

Then visualize the best that can happen when you own your purpose. Visualize the positive impact you can have on your team, company, customers or community.

And then feel the magnificent energy when you commit to making your purpose real.

The Week in Ethics

Gael O’Brien, December 3o, 2016

Gael O’Brien is an executive coach, presenter and leadership columnist. She publishes The Week in Ethics and is a columnist for Business Ethics Magazine where her December column  is Where Wells Fargo Goes from Here

Please follow The Week in Ethics FB page which provides ongoing updates of news items with ethical implications.

Advertisements

The Week in Ethics: Women Leaders Galvanize Detroit Around Justice

November 8, 2015

photo gold key in puzzle doorWhen things fall apart for lack of human and financial resources, becoming overwhelming, the key that enables leaders to transform the impossible to solvable is a compelling sense of greater purpose that is shared.

An illustration is the story of how Kym Worthy, Prosecutor of Wayne County, Michigan raised, and is a catalyst in efforts to continue to raise, the millions of dollars needed to process over 11,000 rape kits that were unopened and untested, found in Police storage; some there as long as 30 years. The move to solvable is often slow, demanding resilience. For Worthy, who began this effort in 2009, it evolved from personal and professional commitment and actions to enlisting others in the goal that justice be available to each rape victim.

As with any leadership act once it taps into others’ shared beliefs, momentum builds that can overcome obstacles. Worthy’s efforts got on the radar of Detroit businesswoman Joanna Cline who involved other Detroit businesses in raising funds, awareness and donating services. A public-private partnership called Enough SAID (Sexual Assault in Detroit) has been created.

Meanwhile, Detroit had its own problems filing for, and then emerging from, bankruptcy. This could have derailed the business leaders’ efforts. However the fundraising continued. As an outcome of ethical leadership, the stakeholders had grown to include the city of Detroit as well as the rape victims.

“The business community has rallied around us,” said Peg Tallet, chief community engagement officer at Michigan Women’s Foundation in an interview, “particularly businesswomen who are saying this can’t happen here if we are going to make this the city we’re all working to make it.”

Worthy’s office “has been able to identify 625 people suspected of being serial sexual assault offenders.” According to one of the businessmen involved in Enough SAID, “…you can’t have economic development if you can’t feel safe walking to your car after work.”

Those involved in Enough SAID provide a crucial teachable moment for other cities, governments, chambers of commerce, businesses and communities in general.

The Week in Ethics

Gael O’Brien, November 8, 2015

Gael O’Brien is The Ethics Coach columnist  for Entrepreneur Magazine. She is also a columnist for Business Ethics Magazine where her September column  is “Volkswagen’s Next Challenge: Keep Scandal from Happening Again.”

The Week in Ethics: The Way Forward from Public Shaming

July 15, 2015

iPhone April 11, 2014 272 Students in a middle school painted words important to them on rocks placed under a tree. “Patience,” “courage,” “strength,” and “peace” were scattered under the limbs. However the lineup of a yellow heart, “tolerance” and “healing” held my eye during a walk in 2013; they were an antidote to the lack of humanity words as weapons cause.

I thought of those rocks this week after reading So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, a new book by journalist Jon Ronson. He recounts recent examples of how far an online posse of righteous shamers can go condemning others’ ethical failings, judgment errors or offensive attempts at humor. Among the stories of social media shaming that Ronson includes are journalist Jonah Lehrer’s plagiarism, the racist-interpreted “joke” tweet of PR executive Justine Sacco and the obscene gesture in a photograph in Arlington National Cemetery Lindsey Stone posted of herself on Facebook.

Social media has a piranha capacity to feed off self-sabotage. Rationally, authors know plagiarism is an ethical time bomb, just as news anchors understand lying and distorting facts destroy credibility (the problems of Brian Williams erupted after the book was written). And no one should be surprised that Twitter and Facebook accounts don’t guarantee quiet repositories for acting out unfiltered attempts at humor.

However, not understanding the consequences of enraged social media is to be in denial over the potential consequences of losses — in jobs, trust, reputation, safety (as attacks cut more deeply personal) and even one’s life. It is a double-sided ignorance: Not seeing the piranha waits or recognizing if you and the piranha have become one.

Ronson, writing about the impact of the public shaming on Lehrer, explained:

“People were very keen to imagine Jonah as shameless, as lacking in that quality, like he was something not quite human that had adopted human form. I suppose it’s no surprise we feel the need to dehumanize the people we hurt — before, during, or after the hurting occurs….In psychology it’s known as cognitive dissonance. It’s the idea that it feels stressful and painful for us to hold two contradictory ideas at the same time (like the idea that we’re kind people and the idea that we’ve just destroyed someone.)”

Ultimately, shaming, Ronson writes, dehumanizes the onlooker as well as the person being shamed.

Shamers get trapped in feedback reinforcement says documentary filmmaker Adam Curtis , whom Ronson quotes. That process, Curtis points out: “… locks people off in the world they started with and prevents them from finding out anything different.”

A world of instant reaction means what we put out on social media stands alone without context or qualification. And rather than our comments accepted as random orphans of thought by people who know us and make allowances, strangers not in our circle can weigh in. To them, whatever we say or do is seen as a representation of who we are. It creates an accountability we dodge at our peril. Ideally, knowing this allows us to operate with more attention to our emotional intelligence — particularly our self-awareness, self-regulation and empathy.

As for viewers, instant reaction triggers instant judgments, often building off the tone of comments that have gone before. If reaction becomes outrage, are we even aware when it crosses over into shaming, bullying, threatening and deconstructing… fueled by assuming the other person “deserves” whatever we volley at them from behind the net of our anonymity? The irony is that our own thoughtlessness, insensitivity and capacity to injure can occur with the greatest frequency when we are convinced of the rightness of our own point of view.

In Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict, author Donna Hicks writes that while people have to earn respect through behaviors and actions, “dignity is a birthright” that everyone deserves. “Treating people badly because they have done something wrong only perpetuates the cycle of indignity,”she writes. “What is worse,” she continues, “we violate our own dignity in the process. Others’ bad behavior doesn’t give us license to treat them badly in return.”

“Dignity” — honoring one’s own and others –an enduring antidote to support diversity of opinion and our humanity.

The Week in Ethics

Gael O’Brien, July 15, 2015

Gael O’Brien is The Ethics Coach columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine. She is also a columnist for Business Ethics Magazine where her July column is “Why More Companies Are Speaking Out on Social Issues.”

 

 

 

The Week in Ethics: Project 22

May 25, 2015

Memorial Day in the United States is more than remembrance; it is also a catalyst for a discussion that needs to occur throughout the year.

As a day, it is about respect and remembrance honoring those who’ve died in wars or military actions as well as remembering those dead who were also veterans. However, it also raises the ongoing question about respect and support for veterans who are living. Particularly those sent into conflicts or combat in places around the world, returning wounded or with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), where we’ve intervened to protect people, principles or governments without sufficient agreement or understanding at home about whether we should be fighting those battles.

So this begs the question of what additional support is needed? Statistics that 22 veterans commit suicide each day may not give us yet the full context for these deaths, but it makes it harder to ignore a longstanding problem that haunts many veterans.

Daniel Egbert and Doc King, co-founders of Medicinal Missions, are combat-wounded veterans who created Project 22, which started as a 6,500 mile cross-country awareness campaign about veteran suicide; they interviewed researchers, health care providers and veterans. The results of their trip is a just-released, 102-minute documentary, called Project 22, of the stories of loss, survival and hope that Egbert and King heard.

I learned about the film from a student taking an ethics course I taught. Dealing with PTSD after his return from combat duty and taking a full course-load, as well as navigating a part-time job and family responsibilities, he acknowledged that he thought about suicide every day. Support from his family and others kept him going, he said, but the question haunting him is why he survived when so many in his unit were killed. Home a year, he indicated that he hadn’t, as of last month, been able to get an appointment at a Veterans Administration hospital. Revelations about long waits to receive care in the VA Health System received much attention in the last few years, but recent reports indicate not enough has changed.

While a recent poll indicated returning veterans feel much more is needed to help them find jobs and transition to civilian life, companies (including Cisco, General Electric and Starbucks) universities, states and the federal government (including the VA) have stepped up with room for so many more to do so. Pubic recognition is mixed. Goodwill gestures to pay tribute to veterans at sporting events, for example, are often genuine but lose  value when hijacked to be more about promoting others’ brands than the veterans themselves.

The issues of returning home after military service are more complex when the service is not viewed the same way that fighting was in the World Wars. Ways of being grounded by a sense of belonging, feeling valued and sacrifice that mattered need to have a huge internal quotient to compensate for gaps in external validation.

We are a society of huge achievements. That helps guide us in looking at ways to address unmet needs.

A documentary like Project 22 opens wider avenues of conversation and potential collaboration around ways of better understanding and meeting needs.

The Week in Ethics

Gael O’Brien, May 25, 2015

Gael O’Brien is The Ethics Coach columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine. She is also a columnist for Business Ethics Magazine.